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  • kspirit - Thursday, July 02, 2015 - link

    How much cheaper will the home version be compared to Pro? Because if there isn't a huge difference then Home cuts out a lot of features. I've always used Pro so I didn't know about these limitations.. it's not even possible to log into a Domain on Home? :/ It's not supposed to be a 'Pro' feature. Even my university requires us to get on their Domain to access the intranet. Reply
  • boozed - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    Why not use the education version? Reply
  • kspirit - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    Well, my laptop came with W8 Pro preloaded... But it's a business line computer. I'm pretty sure many of the regular laptop buyers get the Home version with their consumer-grade computers... Reply
  • Samus - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    A lot of students qualify for a cheap license to Windows 7 Pro. You just pop the product key into Windows Anytime Update and it converts Windows 7 Home to Pro after 10 minutes and a reboot.

    Probably one of the best features Windows Vista introduced.
    Reply
  • deV14nt - Thursday, July 09, 2015 - link

    Win 8.1 Pro upgrade for students from 7 or Vista or XP is $69. The "anytime upgrade" / "pro pack" / "add features" from 8.1 to Pro is still $99. As a student you're better off upgrading to 8.1 Pro from XP than from 8.1. Reply
  • KikassAssassin - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    I don't know if they've announced pricing for Windows 10 yet, but it's been $120 for Home and $200 for Pro for the retail box of the last few Windows versions. If you're a student, you can get student pricing for Windows 8.1 Pro for $70. Reply
  • WorldWithoutMadness - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    Ask your uni whether they are in Microsoft edu program.
    You may get free license for that. If not, you can buy at discounted price for being a student.
    As always, you are welcome to the free side of linux.
    Reply
  • kspirit - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    Yeah we get access to pretty much every Microsoft software through uni... VS (even Ultimate), Windows, Office 365, etc. But a lot of students don't know about it, or don't know how to use or access it. It's a mess... Reply
  • cygnus1 - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    Joining a computer to an AD domain and authenticating against the domain to access a server aren't the same thing. Home can do the latter but not the former. Reply
  • Wolfpup - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    Good point. I use Pro, but never join a domain, but access servers all the time. Reply
  • extide - Saturday, July 04, 2015 - link

    These limitations have always been the case, this is not a new thing with windows 10. Reply
  • ShieTar - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    No Remote Desktop for Home users seems new. Reply
  • danbob999 - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    The client will be there, just not the server. It's similar to previous windows versions. Reply
  • h4rm0ny - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    Unfortunately what I need is the other way around. I want to be able to provide relatives with a cheap (well, affordable - not quite the same thing) Home edition and remote login to help with problems. Reply
  • Wolfpup - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    Well bear in mind this has been the same with every consumer version of NT. For some reason in this thread people keep acting like 10 changes something when it looks pretty much identical to 8 which was the same as 7, Vista, and XP... Reply
  • deV14nt - Thursday, July 09, 2015 - link

    Use Teamviewer. Even with access to RD, Teamviewer is usually less hassle. Reply
  • Dribble - Monday, July 13, 2015 - link

    Just use Ammyy. http://www.ammyy.com/en/ Reply
  • Cat Herder - Friday, May 13, 2016 - link

    TeamViewer is what you need to support relatives. Free for non-professional use and really very good. Reply
  • Wolfpup - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    No, that's always been a 'Pro' feature. Reply
  • extide - Saturday, July 11, 2015 - link

    It's not new. No 'Home' version of windows has ever included RDP. This just the same its always been. Reply
  • Mark_gb - Sunday, July 05, 2015 - link

    Home will be $119.
    Pro will be $199.
    Reply
  • Wolfpup - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    "Regular" versions of NT have never supported joining a domain. This dates back to at least 2001.

    I don't care about that (I don't join a domain even on a domain!) But bitlocker is awesome. Under Vista and 7 (?) it required "Ultimate" but thankfully moved down to "Pro" under 8.
    Reply
  • boozed - Thursday, July 02, 2015 - link

    Good to see the old delayed recycle bin is still available, and in all editions! Reply
  • peterfares - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    Delayed recycle bin? Reply
  • CaedenV - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    ... I assume Pro/Ent get Virtualization support as well? What about Edu? Reply
  • npz - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    It should be noted with Device Encyption for ConnctedStandby devices, it requires an MS account to use (if not AD joined) and your keys are automatically uploaded to MS and it also uses the weaker 128-bit AES.

    With Bitlocker, you have choices (local account, recovery including paper backup or nothing, 256-bit AES)
    Reply
  • vbmluis - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    Have a Windows 7 Starter with the Windows 10 Free update notification, wonder if this is gonna have Home Edition for Free. Reply
  • Dahak - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    Yes you will get Windows 10 Home, as the free upgrade

    https://www.thurrott.com/windows/windows-10/3887/w...
    Reply
  • dealcorn - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    Are the license terms of Win 10 Home somewhere described? Does the Win 10 license permit limited portability features similar to those of an OEM license? Does a Win 10 license permit the use of a VM? Does your use of the word "yes" mean: yes I lose rights with the upgrade? Reply
  • TormDK - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    From Microsofts newly revised Terms of use;

    Desktop Operating Systems
    Device License
    1. Customer may install one copy of the software on a Licensed Device or within a local virtual hardware system on a Licensed Device for each License it acquires.
    2. Customer may use the software on up to two processors.
    3. Local use is permitted for any user.
    4. Remote use is permitted for the Primary User of the Licensed Device and for any other user from another Licensed Device or a Windows VDA Licensed Device.
    5. Only one user may access and use the software at a time.
    6. Customer may connect up to 20 devices to the Licensed Device for file sharing, printing, Internet Information Services, Internet Connection Sharing or telephony services.
    7. An unlimited number of connections are allowed for KMS activation or similar technology.
    Reply
  • Wolfpup - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    Uhh...what's this 20 devices thing? Almost sounds like you can only have 20 devices on your home network lol Reply
  • bug77 - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    Remote desktop would have been nice for Home. Makes it easier to fix relatives' PCs.
    And also, what's "granular UX control"?
    Reply
  • Murloc - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    well teamviewer still works anyway, right? Reply
  • Oxford Guy - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    TeamViewer, eh? Reply
  • cjb110 - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    Note Remote Desktop is separate from Remote Assistance. i.e. You can initiate a connection to your relatives' PC, but they can ask you for help and you can connect to it. Reply
  • flashpowered - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    Although I have a Pro licence, it would be really nice for BitLocker to be on all editions. On my Crucial SSD the encryption is hardware powered. Then again it would also be nice if Apple updated FileVault to offload encryption to the drive too, as I see a Mac in my future eventually. Reply
  • Wolfpup - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    Yep, I've got a Crucial M4 (doesn't support hardware encryption, though software is fast and fine) and an M500 which does support hardware encryption. Works flawlessly! Reply
  • jabber - Tuesday, July 07, 2015 - link

    Yeah full disk encryption is lovely as long as you are aware of the caveats to using it. It can bite you hard if you don't know what you are doing and don't take the right precautions. I've seen some 'normal' users try out encryption, didn't understand the risks and read the instructions and their tears have sustained me.

    Really only use full disk if you really really need to use it.
    Reply
  • Murloc - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    it's good they simplified the choice. Reply
  • Oxford Guy - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    Isn't the loss of Remote Desktop no biggie since you can get TeamViewer for free? Reply
  • peterfares - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    RDP has never been available for Home versions. Yeah, you can use TeamViewer on Home edition. RDP is a better protocol and the experience on RDP is better, but it isn't very easy to set up like TeamViewer is. It requires port forwarding whereas TeamViewer just requires you to log into your account. It would be great if Microsoft enhanced RDP and let you use your Microsoft Account to connect instead of requiring to set up port forwards and dynamic DNS but they don't. Reply
  • freeskier93 - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    Port forwarding is pretty quick and dirty. Not terribly secure since your exposing the machine directly to the internet. Then if you want to access multiple machines that's more ports you have to open. Setting up a VPN is a bit more work but a better solution. Reply
  • Gigaplex - Sunday, July 05, 2015 - link

    Sure, I'll just ask my parents to set up port forwarding on their crappy ISP provided modem so I can remotely connect to their computer to fix whatever is wrong with it. Can't see them getting confused by that at all. Reply
  • kmmatney - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    I use both RDP and Teamviewer for work (commercial license) - TeamViewer is overall better, especially with file transfer, and the other person can also see what you are doing. The loss of RDP for home edition is really no big deal. Reply
  • Wolfpup - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    Home DID NOT LOSE RDP. Home has NEVER had RDP.

    In fact, home will continue to have remote assistance, which it's always had (which really uses RDP, of course, but...)
    Reply
  • dealcorn - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    I have an OEM Win 8 license. It allows me a limited portability right and also the right to run a virtual machine as long as only one license is active at any point in time. If I upgrade to Win 10, do I retain the limited portability rights? If I upgrade to Win 10, do I retain my limited right to run one simultaneous VM? Can I upgrade an existing VM to Win 10. After the 1 year conversion period, do I retain the right to upgrade a VM to Win 10? Basically, does the upgrade limit my existing rights in any way? Reply
  • Lerianis - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    No idea, you would have to contact Microsoft and talk with them about that. Reply
  • moistbuns - Friday, July 03, 2015 - link

    Can you connect to a Windows Server with the Home Edition? I.e. to map network drives. Reply
  • Gigaplex - Sunday, July 05, 2015 - link

    Yes, standard file sharing works on Home Edition. Reply
  • makerofthegames - Saturday, July 04, 2015 - link

    Is W10 Home still limited to one CPU? I've got an old Mac Pro, and W8 Home limits it to one CPU (two cores), instead of using both (four cores). I assume the free update is W8 Home -> W10 Home, so it would be nice if it didn't arbitrarily restrict my hardware. Reply
  • Lerianis - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    Say what? Do you have TWO discrete processors (one plugged into one slot, another plugged into another)?
    If so, yes.... Windows 10 Home will still only use ONE of those processors but really a home machine should not have two processors.
    It should have ONE processor with MULTIPLE CORES, which means that no matter how many cores are on that processor, it should use them all!

    If your machine is not using all the cores on your single processor, you have tweaked some settings to make it default to that behavior.
    Reply
  • Wolfpup - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    Yeah, I'm not sure if "regular" Windows 8 supports up to 256 cores, or if it has some lower limit (I can't find one), but it sure as heck supports more than 2 :-O Reply
  • watersb - Tuesday, July 07, 2015 - link

    The older, tower Mac Pros have two discrete processors, each either dual or quad-core. Reply
  • SloppySlim - Saturday, July 04, 2015 - link

    yeah , well , I'm more concerned with being able to rip features out , disable ms spyware , and replace os functionality with aftermarket upgrades Reply
  • Nibholm - Sunday, July 05, 2015 - link

    Well, as decision what updates/upgrades/downgrades to install is taken from user you really can't escape m$ spyware.You still can use powershell etc. to uninstall most of the useless (for desktop at least) touchscreen orientated apps and windows shop. But for example Cortana can't be uninstalled and even if you disable web search etc. it will still connect to cloud even with local searches. Whole Windows 10 feels lot like mobile os aka Android where user has little control. Reply
  • Lerianis - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    Microsoft needs to move on past not including Bitlocker in Windows 10 Home. Device encryption, in my opinion, is a mandatory thing today, not an optional anymore.
    Why? Because we have too many nosy nancies on this planet who search through people's hard drives in order to find something they dislike and then hose a person's system.
    Yes, I'm talking about the techies at Best Buy and elsewhere.
    Reply
  • A5 - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    Encryption won't stop someone logged in to your system (your "tech at BB" scenario).

    The use is to keep someone from removing the HDD of a system that they can't get into otherwise and reading it on another system.
    Reply
  • jabber - Tuesday, July 07, 2015 - link

    Mmm yes I can see it now the legions of numpty home users all encrypting their HDDs and not making a note of the password/decrypt key/disk etc. then running odd software that causes lots of crashes/corrupted HDD, not bothering with backups and their HDD dies....oh and it will all be MS's fault this happened.

    Keep 'normal' users away from full disk encryption. It's a liability. I've seen the carnage!
    Reply
  • jabber - Tuesday, July 07, 2015 - link

    Oh yes and trying to clean off a dirty virus ridden encrypted system HDD using a separate docker will be a no no too! Yes normal users get a lot of those. Reply
  • Skwiff - Friday, July 10, 2015 - link

    For BitLocker you need Active Directory with your device joined to the domain. Your BitLocker recovery keys are stored in Active Directory so you never need to write down or remember it. That's why it's only available in Pro and Enterprise. Reply
  • TheUnhandledException - Friday, July 10, 2015 - link

    That is not true. Bitlocker has and continues to work with Pro on local machine (not connected to domain). Yes it is an OPTION to have recovery keys stored in AD but not a requirement. Reply
  • Lerianis - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    Excuse me? Will still connect to cloud even with local searches? Citation for this please because I think you are spouting bullplop. Reply
  • Lerianis - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    Say what? Do you have TWO discrete processors (one plugged into one slot, another plugged into another)?
    If so, yes.... Windows 10 Home will still only use ONE of those processors but really a home machine should not have two processors.
    It should have ONE processor with MULTIPLE CORES, which means that no matter how many cores are on that processor, it should use them all!

    If your machine is not using all the cores on your single processor, you have tweaked some settings to make it default to that behavior.
    Reply
  • Lerianis - Monday, July 06, 2015 - link

    No idea, you would have to contact Microsoft and talk with them about that. Reply
  • Nibholm - Tuesday, July 07, 2015 - link

    Well, run resource monitor, disable all web features from search and type something. If http://i.imgur.com/tUaJKOw.png (SearchUi.exe) don't happen then i'm wrong. Reply
  • Pessimism - Friday, July 10, 2015 - link

    I REALLY wish they would stop making Windows to Go an Enterprise only feature. Windows has been terrible at this for years. You can take a hard drive with a copy of OSX, plug it into any Mac and it will boot. Try that with Windows and you get bluescreens, for 20+ years and counting. Yes there is sysprep and products like macrium redeploy, but why can't they just build this in? Reply

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